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USS Anderson



Field Maloney (is that a real name?) has written an interesting article over at Slate.com that ponders if Owen Wilson was the chief ingredient in making Wes Anderson movies good. I agree with most of it, but found it an interesting read all the way through. Check it out.

Click here to read the article

Posted by Chad
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2:52 PM

I've not yet clicked on your link yet. But I would say before I infect myself with someone else's hypothesis that I've long argued that when discussing Bottle Rocket and Rushmore a great deal more credit is due Mr. Wilson. If you read interviews with Anderson and Wilson circa Bottle Rocket and Rushmore, or simply listened to the commentary on Rushmore it was clear the two had very different influences. Andeson talked about French films and New Yorker articles, where as Wilson would mention Steinbeck and The Great Gatsby. Anderson is certainly the cinephile of the two, the self styled intellectual. While Wilson seems to be the storyteller, the one who lent their first two films humanity and warmth. While Anderson is preoccupied with aesthetics and references to other films, Wilson seems to be interested in good old fashioned, straightforward storytelling. I'm not sure that either's sensibility would function on it's own. Anderson has now paired himself with Noah Baumbach, a writer and director cut from a very similar cloth as Anderson. Where as Owen Wilson and Wes Anderson balanced each others impulses nicely. Anderson and Baumbach are all head and no heart.    



2:58 PM

having now read the article i see that we seem to be sync, as i said it echoes what i've long said, thus i agree entirely.    



6:41 PM

I came to similar conclusions as Maloney after seeing the life aquatic. All of Anderson's archetypes were there, lined up in a neat little row like paper dixie cups on the kitchen counter, and you go to take a a sip but there's nothing in there, man. You're like, Where's my Kool-Aid? And nobody will look at you straight in the face. There's no Kool-Aid. Not today.    



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